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Residence and work permits The rules for living and working in Denmark.

Depending on the type of job and your country of origin, different rules apply to obtaining a residence and/or work permit for Denmark.

 

EU/EEA citizens
As an EU/EEA citizen you may freely enter Denmark and remain here for up to three months without an EU residence document (registration certificate).

If you are a job seeker, you may reside in Denmark for up to six months without a registration certificate. The length of your stay is calculated from the date of entry into the country.

If you expect that your stay in Denmark will last more than three months, you have to apply for an EU residence document (registration certificate) before the end of your first three months in the country. Job seekers are required to submit their application within six months after entry.


An EU residence document is your proof that, as an EU/EEA citizen or a family member of an EU/EEA citizen, you have the right to reside in Denmark. You must submit your application in person at International Citizen Service.


Nordic citizens

If you are a citizen of Finland, Iceland, Norway or Sweden, you need not apply for a registration certificate. As a citizen of a Nordic country you have the right to reside in Denmark.


Citizens from outside the Nordic countries, the EU/EEA and Switzerland

If you are a citizen from a country outside Scandinavia, the EU/EEA or Switzerland, you must apply for a residence and/or work permit in your home country through a Danish mission, i.e. a Danish Embassy or a Danish Consulate General. In the majority of cases your future employer in Denmark will provide the necessary information for the application.


There are several different options for a residence and work permit in Denmark. Your education, qualifications, and the type of job you have been offered are all important factors in determining how you should apply. You must be aware that Danish authorisation may be a condition for your residence and/or work permit. This applies, for example, if you are going to work as a doctor, dentist, or a school teacher.

As of 20 May 2012, all non-EU citizens over the age of 18 applying for residence permits under the terms of the Aliens Act must have their biometric features (facial image and fingerprints) recorded when submitting their application. Biometric features will also be recorded when applying to renew a residence permit and when applying for permanent residency.

Contact International Citizen Service for additional information and assistance.

Read more about registration certificates, residence- and work permits here: Life In Denmark.